Home Map E-mail
 
Eng |  Հայ |  Türk |   Рус  |  Fr  

Home
Main
Delegations
Site map
Feedback
Contacts
Links
Pre-Genocide Armenia
History of Armenia
Pre-Genocide photos
Armenian Genocide
What is Genocide
Armenian Genocide
Chronology
Photos of Armenian Genocide
100 photographic stories
Mapping Armenian Genocide
Cultural Genocide
Remember
Documents
American
British
German
Russian
French
Austrian
Turkish

Research
Bibliography
Survivors Stories
Eye-Witnesses
Media
Quotations
Public Lectures
Recognition
States
International organizations
Provincial governments
Public petitions
Mission Statement
Director`s message
Press-releases
Museum G-Brief
Interviews
News
Conferences
Events of AGMI
Year of Book 
Lemkin scholarship 
Meet the Alumni 
Most Read 
   Museum
Museum Info
Plan a visit
Permanent exhibition
Temporary exhibition
Online exhibition  
Memorial postcards  
   Institute
Goals & Endeavors
Publications
AGMI Journals  
Library
AGMI collection
   Tsitsernakaberd Complex
Description and History
Memorial complex photos
Remembrance day
Friends of AGMI Foundation
 

Armenian General Benevolent Union
All Armenian Fund
Armenian News Agency
armin
armin
armin




News

EVERY ARMENIAN IS A DOCUMENT- SAID LUSIE CHAKIR (ASHOTYAN), HRANT DINK’S MATERNAL-GRANDMOTHER, SURVIVOR OF ARMENIAN GENOCIDE: EPISODES FROM HER LIFE


19.01.2018


Alice

Hrant Dink with his mother
“Hrant, darling, I don’t remember much about 1915 events, but my biography, as well as those of many other survivors, are documents about the genocide”.

Lusi(n)e Chakir(Chaqr) was a daughter of Efendi Manuel Ashotyan, a craftsman and a father of five from Gyurunts. She was the only daughter of her father, and he used to call her Ahchig (Aghchik (girl in Armenian)), thus her name remained Aghchik. She was one of those little Armenian survivor-girls chosen from the deportation caravans and handled to the Qangal orphanage in Sebastia.

Lusie Chakir was Hrant Dink’s maternal-grandmother.

It was 1915. Lusie’s elder brother Artashes had moved to the USA to get education. As her relatives recalled based on her stories, the entire family was impatiently waiting for a letter from Artashes. In the evening there was a knock on the door, but a policeman instead of a postman was standing on the door. A telegram from Constantinople notified about the start of massacres. Armenians were being deported in groups. Little Lousie, the only daughter of her father, was following the course of events with her brothers. Meanwhile, “hunters of people” were selecting from the deportation caravans beautiful and healthy ones. “Lusie has also appeared in their focus,” – recall her relatives, adding however, that Lusie didn’t remember much about 1915.

A wealthy merchant Mihra Bey had chosen three young girls from a caravan, to serve in his big house, and Lusie was among them. She left her family moving to a private house.

“My mother is from Gyurunts, and father Andranik is from Erzrum, My mother moved from Gyurunts to Sebastia, where she served in the house of Mihri bey with a few other little Armenian girls.”- recalls her son Armenak Chakir.

Mihr Bey was living a dissolute life, but his wife was more conscientious. After a while she instructed Hakob, a cooker in her house, to secretly take these three girls to the orphanage in Sebastia (American college). It is unclear why she did so; according to the relatives' memoirs, probably to provide more favorable conditions for children. “Orphanage was a shelter, rescue for children”- says Ervand Dink, Hrant Dink’s brother. Soon, however, the woman who had founded and directed the orphanage became sick and died; orphanage was closed and children were dispersed.

Afterwards Lusie passed through the difficulties of life, until she met her future husband, Andranik (Ando) Chakir/Chakr from Erzurum when working on potato fields.

One day Ando from Erzurum met one of his compatriots in Sebastia, and learned that his whole family was no longer alive, as a result of which he had experienced psychological hardships. To ameliorate the situation, the compatriot advised him to marry, pointing to a tall, rigid Armenian woman, working in the field, with striking beauty and pride, “who had never looked at a man’s face.” “Unwilling to marry a Turk” Lusie married Andranik (Ando) from Erzurum.

Thirty years old Ando and sixteen years old Aghchik married and lived in Qangal. They got six children; three girls and three boys, Haykaz, Satenik, Sargis (Mustafa), Armenak, Nvard (Gyulvard), Siranush.

Nvard was Hrant Dink’s mother.

Hrant Dink tried to write down all the memories of his grandmother, as according to her “Every Armenian is a document”. His Grandmother was very much respected in her family and community and her words were quite heavy. She played a decisive role in the lives of Hrant Dink and his brothers. When their parents divorced, the brothers escaped from the house by the initiative of Hrant Dink. “Three brothers who escaped from the house and were lost in the streets…My brothers and I were running and running along the streets of Gum Gapu…How long it lasted, I do not know… Finally, the police found us… We were in Gum Gapu fishing pad, three of us were in a pannier embracing each other as strong as we could we were sleeping hungry and thirsty”- recalls Hrant Dink.

After this incident, Lusie went to Children's Nest’s (Orphanage) in the basement of the Armenian Protestant church of Getikpasha asking Hrant Qyuchugyuzelyan, director of recovery Station, to shelter the children. At first he refused, because the Orphanage was only for poor and orphaned Armenian children, and the number of children exceeded the prescribed limit.

Hrant Qyuchugyuzelyan was a celibate priest in the Armenian Protestant Church of Getikpasha, who was the first to give shelter to Armenian orphaned children, the first to initiate rescue operations.

However, when Lusie told him about the fishing pad, the director agreed to take in the children.

Lusie lived a very long life, to re-live the days of her lost childhood, as pointed by her relatives.


Elina Mirzoyan AGMI Researcher







Pupils of American orphanage, Sebastia 1923



Armenian Protestant Church of Getikpasha



Scene from Gyurun


Ժողովարանի անոք երեխաները


Orphanage boys in the church garden


Dink brothers in childhood


Little leader Hrant Dink


Hrant Dink, senior among the children








FOLLOW US



VIRTUAL MUSEUM

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

genocide
The Comparative Analysis of the 20th Century Genocides
International Association of Genocide Scholars
The twelfth meeting
8-12 July 2015, Yerevan

LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP

Lemkin
AGMI ANNOUNCES 2018
LEMKIN SCHOLARSHIP FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

SPECIAL PROJECT

100photo
100 PHOTO STORIES ABOUT THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE


TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS

brand book
Temporary exhibitions dedicated to the Armenian Genocide

During 2015, within the framework of the events dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, the AGMI plans to organize nearly twenty different multilingual exhibitions of new scientific scholarship using modern technologies and design in different countries simultaneously. There will be accompanying exhibition leaflets, catalogues and booklets in Armenian and foreign languages. In parallel, the AGMI plans to publish memoirs and monographs in Armenian and foreign languages.

REMEMBER

remember
Mickayel Frenkulyan, had studied at the Oberlin college in USA. He was a professor at the American college of Sebastia. In 1915 he was arrested and killed. A victim of Armenian Genocide.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ARMENIAN GENOCIDE STUDIES  

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ARMENIAN GENOCIDE STUDIES
“AGMI” foundation
8/8 Tsitsernakaberd highway
0028, Yerevan, RA
Tel.: +374 39 09 81
    2007-2018 © The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute     E-mail: info@genocide-museum.am